How To Become A Successful Orator

A complete guide to hone your presentation skills
How To Become A Successful Orator

Author: Dr. Milind V. Bhutkar
Format: Paperback
Language: English
ISBN: 9788178061702
Code: 9375B
Pages: 179
List Price: Rs. 150.00
Price: Rs. 120.00   You Save: Rs. 30.00 (20.00%)

Publisher: Unicorn Books
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Effective communication with the audience is an essential element to jumpstart your career. This practical and easy to use book will show you how to influence your audience with crisp and immaculate presentations. Its lively style and down-to-earth advice will help you to master all the skills required for those high impact presentations which would put you in the driver's seat in your profession. Here is a glimpse of what you will be equipped with after perusing the "How to Become A Successful Orator: Active listening skills, accent neutralisation, self management skills, composing the draft, using humour in the presentation, creating great visuals" both for OHP as well as for PowerPoint, memorising the presentation, conquering the presentation anxiety, presentation delivery, effective use of body language and handling the presentation emergencies. You name the aspect of presentation and you will find it covered in this concise book.
A special feature of the book comprises more than 100 illustrations and cartoons that make the tips easy to grasp and easier to apply. Once you act on the advice given in this book, you will be amazed to see how effortlessly the "terrible" presentations and presenters are converted into the "terrific" ones.

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About the Author(s)

Dr. Milind V. Bhutkar obtained his MBBS and MD from B.J. Medical College Pune. He has a rich teaching experience working in various medical colleges across Maharashtra and Karnataka. Presently he is Professor, Department of Physiology, M.R. Medical College Gulbarga. He has been an avid presenter with many prizes being awarded for his scientific presentations and posters. He has guided a number of award winning presentations and seminars by his students, interns and junior staff members.Writing has been a passion for Dr. Milind Bhutkar with a number of articles being published in various newspapers and magazines. In addition, he has several research publications to his credit. His maiden literary venture has been a book called "Principles Of Exercise Prescription". The present title "How to Become A Successful Orator" is his second step in the world of writing. Presently he is working on a book on Memory Maps, which hopefully, is a beginning of a series of titles to come.

Contents

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Section 1 : The Icebreaker
Prologue ; Why effective presentations are an essential entity? ; How to flatten your audience in two minutes flat! ; Self-Audit ; The skills you ought to develop in order to be a good presenter ; Sure you hear! But do you listen? ; Mind your language ; Words are the cells of the language ; What do you do with the new word? ; The most abused words ; Do you sound authentic? ; Accent neutralisation ; Observation skills ; Time-management ; Self-management ; Still in love with the blue-eyed monster? ; How to tame the blue-eyed monster? ; Whether it’s war, expedition or a presentation,strategy is a must ; Plan out your work and work out your plan ; Those who help their audience, help themselves ; The audience is not a vase to be filled, but a fire to be ignited. ; Motivation for electrifying-presentations ; Begin early

Section 2: Composing a Draft
Channelize your thoughts ; Writing a rough draft ; Think both sides of the argument ; General Organisation ; Don’t bite off more than you can chew ; Be Practical ; The novel approach ; Leave an impact in the mind of the audience ; Don’t fall in love with your presentation ; Plain is uncomplicated ; Using humour to a great effect ; The other side of using humor ; Ten Commandments for drafting your presentation ; Don’t Relax

Section 3: Creating Great Visuals
The power of visuals ; Forgot the most important step? ; Designing outstanding visuals ; Dealing with the starting trouble ; About the slide projector ; Using the overhead projector ; PowerPoint: A power-packed tool ; Simple is effective ; The GIGO principle ; How big is too big? ; One sees things differently from this end ; Give it an effect to make it effective ; Do you dream in colour? ; Using bullets without a gun ; A picture is worth a thousand words ; Audience loves text reduction ; Let the audience appreciate your graphs ; Balance of text and graphics ; Be consistent in your thoughts, works and visuals ; Tell the audience, where you are right now ; There is no such thing as a self-made man ; Edit, Edit, Edit... ; A sure-fire recipe to annoy the audience ; The PowerPoint crimes ; Seven properties of the stunning visuals ; If you are not happy with your visuals... ; How to get the best out of technology?

Section 4: Getting Prepared for the Acid Test
Remembering some facts about memory ; How to mentally ‘lock-in’your presentation material? ; Practice is the name of the game ; Make some mistakes, please! ; Style does matter! ; The joy of confidence ; You are your best visual ; It is not my cup of tea ; A phenomenon called anxiety ; How to conquer the presentation anxiety? ; The night before... ; The D-day ; As the countdown begins

Section 5: The Moment of Truth
The master mesmerizer in action ; Taking control with your body language ; Eyes are the showcase of the soul ; The Presentation Delivery ; Lack in depth cannot be made up with excess in length ; Keeping your audience interested ; Overcoming the talking terror

Section 6: Expect the Unexpected
Handling the question-answer session ; Dealing with a hostile audience ; When presentation emergencies strike... ; The audience feedback mechanisms ; The 7 habits of highly successful presenters ; Enjoy your success ; Crossing the bridge of diffidence ; Epilogue

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Sample Chapters


(Following is an extract of the content from the book)
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Tell the audience, where you are right now

Know your destination and the correct path leading to it because the world steps aside for the man who knows where he is going.
Anonymous

A presentation should be pleasant for both the presenter as well as the audience. This is possible only when there is a meaningful sharing of ideas between the presenter and the audience. But in many instances the audience is ambulating, i.e. they won't attend your presentation right from the beginning to the end. They will leave midway to attend their mobile phone or some may be the late joiners. For such audience it becomes almost impossible to catch up with the presentation. Not only do they become disinterested themselves but also prove to be a nagging source of disturbance to the others as well.
To help such audience, it is a good idea to include map indicator in your slides. It is a small numerical or pictorial depiction that appears at the bottom of every slide. It helps the audience to find out exactly at what stage the presentation is. There are two ways to put map indicators numerical and in the form of a pie chart.
Numerical map indicators: Here you assign numbers to various parts or sections of your presentation. At the bottom of the slide the numbers are put serially and the current part is highlighted by putting a circle around the relevant number or by changing its colour.
Pie chart map indicator: This method consists of creating a pie chart, i.e. dividing the circle into small parts and assigning the section number or writing the name of the sections, if the space permits.

There is no such thing as a self-made man
Gratitude is a fruit of great cultivation and civilisation.
Anonymous

Behind an able man there are always other able men or women. In your endeavour of presentation, you are helped, encouraged and guided by many. Now it's your duty to thank them. Some of those who have assisted you may be present in the audience. Not acknowledging their support could lead to disastrous results for your future projects. Hence, a thank you slide is a must. But it's worth giving consideration about two points: extent or length of the slide and the timing of projecting this slide.
Normally, refrain from reading a long list of persons as this will consume a significant part of your presentation time, and as most of these are unknown to the audience, warrant their little interest. Instead, you can prepare a photomontage of the people instrumental in developing your presentation and thank them.
If you borrow slides, photographs or data from other people, acknowledge their contribution on that slide itself. This saves the ignominy of looking ungrateful as well as saves valuable presentation time.
Then think about the timing of presenting the acknowledgement slide. If possible present it at the beginning of your talk. This will automatically make you spend only the optimum time on it and chances of skipping it due to lack of time at the end are nullified. This approach may be new to most presenters but it works in most settings.
Last but not the least, don't forget to thank your audience; as without the audience a speaker has no value and he is brought to a naught.

Edit, Edit, Edit
Adopt the pace of the Mother Nature, her secret is patience.
R. W. Emerson

Editing the visuals is a tough job. It's like a battle, but as a dictum goes "Never lose your head in a battle; you won't have a place to put your helmet. Here are some questions you ask yourself while editing:
Simple is powerful
Have you made use of bullet points? (If you have used complete sentences, convert them into points.)
Is my font size appropriate for the projected number of the audience?
Are my font type and the font effects clearly visible?
Are the colors used in the visuals looking restrained or luminous and gaudy?
Are there any visual distractions like moving text or awful animations that reduce the attention span and induce fatigue in the audience?(For the above four questions, project the slide preferably in the same hall you will be presenting and check with your friends seated in the last row.)
Is there a balance between the text and the illustrations on my visuals? (Too much text makes the visuals monotonous while too much of graphics amuses the audience without making them understand what is happening.)
Are there unusual abbreviations or jargon in the text? (Since it may become an impediment in the meaningful communication and indicate a less than professional approach, better avoid non-standard abbreviations.)
And finally the most important question with these number of visuals will I be able to finish my presentation in the allotted time? (Overshooting the assigned time is a breach in the contract with the audience as well as the organisers. Never ever do it.)
Visuals are like stomach; it is not how much you put into it that counts, but how much of it that you and the audience assimilate that really matters. Probably editing is the only place where your ruthlessness will be appreciated by one and all.

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